Female

Bisexual

United States



Hi, I‘m Kata Luna. I am Bisexual.

I am a typical suburban young woman in Pennsylvania, I am an artist and am taking courses at my local college before transferring to Savannah College of Art and Design, in Georgia, where I will double major in fine arts and graphic design. I love cold weather (and yet my school of choice is in Georgia), and this past winter has been beautiful! I hope to move to Norway eventually, to live out my lifelong dream of being a hermit. My other lifelong dream is to be a Martian with the help of Mars One, but that's unlikely. My one reasonable aspiration is to become a concept artist for companies similar to those that made the Halo series (the good ones), the Avatar movie, and the like. I can't wait to get out of my parents house, though I love them. I love Power Metal, specifically I have discovered PelleK's music fairly recently, and am an addict. I love science fiction novels and films that make me think. I really hardly ever drink alcoholic beverages, but when I do I enjoy dark ales, especially craft brews. I have a sweet tooth the size of myself and a ridiculous fast metabolism, which leads to rapid changes in temperament when I eat 3 giant slices of Applebee's chocolate cake. Same concerning alcohol consumption, hence my disinterested in drinking -- I go straight to the hangover. I also love comic books and videogames but more as an observer. I never experienced them until about a year and a half ago. This is primarily due to the quality control imposed on me by my parents. Same goes for food, but with significantly worse results. I cannot drink soda, or many junk foods with lots of oils, to excess. I also am a vegetarian. I have nothing against eating meat, except I have not had it in so long it would most likely make me extremely ill. I am considering trying chicken, though. It doesn't smell bad, and poultry is not far off I think from fish (which I have eaten, so I guess I'm not 100% vegetarian) and I would like to be less of a picky eater, ordering nothing but grilled cheese and pasta dishes when I am taken to certain types of restaurants. I also apparently like writing about me, though in person I'm usually fairly timid.

What being bisexual means to me

I guess my bisexuality doesn't feel "meaningful" to me, not in that sense. It's as much a part of me as my being female, or being 5' 11.5", or having brown hair and freckles. It tells myself and anyone else something about me, and it's a part of who I am, but a "meaning"? I don't know if it has one. My identity was easily accepted by my friends and family, excluding those older generations who do not, will not, and should not know. The LGBT community is widely accepted in my area, for which I am fortunate. This not only gave me the ability to explore who I was openly and without discrimination, but it gave me the ability to identify myself in relation to the people I know. In my area, I know straight, gay, lesbian, transsexual, and transgendered people. I did not know any bisexuals, but I was able to distinguish the difference between my sexuality and the sexuality of others easily enough. I told my parents shortly after concluding exactly where I stood. I told them while at lunch with them and my uncle, and his recent husband and partner of over 20 years. They were moderately surprised, but really barely cared. This is exactly how I feel it should be, because it doesn't in any way change who I am to them.

What I would like the world to know about bisexuals

Being bisexual is complicated to explain to people who don't know anything about it. Just because I'm usually attracted to women, it's not incredibly unusual for me to be attracted to a guy. I am not attracted to everyone I meet, but I like to think I can find the beauty in everyone nonetheless. Each person I have found myself interested in I have liked in a different way, and this can confuse even me. If you don't understand bisexuality, at least be patient when talking to someone about it. It is no different than me questioning why you like what you like, and no matter who you are that can be hard to explain.
My sexuality is not "important" to me, because it is just a part of me; I try to bring it up once in a while because it can be important to the people I meet.

What was your path to a bisexual identity?

As I said, I had a very respectful surrounding while I was discovering myself. I first noticed I was different, though, when I found myself interested in a friend of mine. I had less than no chance with her, because she's asexual. Now our relationship is a strong platonic bond, one I am thankful for.
I am still in a way defining myself, but isn't everyone? I am comfortable and confident with my sexuality, and that is thanks to an amazing collection of friends.

What is the toughest thing about being bisexual?

I still live in an area where most people accept people for who they are, and I have not had to deal with many negative reactions about who I am. I suppose the one thing that is hardest for me is explaining bisexuality to people. It is usually because they are curious about what it's like for me rather than any actual confusion, and I appreciate the interest they take in trying to understand people different from themselves, however I feel like I have the same conversation again and again and again. I don't take issue with it, and I'm glad they are trying to understand me, but it can be somewhat annoying.

What is the best thing about being bisexual?

I like to think that I can see the beauty in everyone, and I can connect with nearly anyone. I love the crude sex jokes made among my guy friends, I relate to their immense adoration of breasts, and I love taking part in the rigorous outdoor activities my girl friends usually avoid. I also am very close to my girl friends, with whom I share almost everything. We connect to each other in ways I feel no guy can truly understand, at least not the guys I am friends with. I feel sometimes that I have been gifted with the best of both worlds, in this way.

How have other people in your life reacted to your bisexuality?

Mostly with indifference or curiosity, though I am a rare and fortunate person in that regard. Sexuality is widely accepted as what it is in my area. A part of who you are.